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14 December 2019

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Jun 11, 2012 — Glenn Loury & John Tomasi
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The Glenn Show

On The Glenn Show, Glenn interviews his colleague John Tomasi about his new book, Free Market Fairness. John explains how economic liberties have been downplayed by political philosophers since the days of John Stuart Mill, and then suggests that John Rawls and Friedrich Hayek would have agreed on some fundamental principles of justice. In the long run, would robust economic rights be the best way to promote social justice? Glenn wants to know why, if Rawls and Hayek were in basic agreement, Rawlsians and Hayekians are today at each others’ throats. Finally, John explains how one can support both economic liberty and social justice.

Jun 10, 2012 — Mike Konczal & Sarah Leonard
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Fireside Chats

On Fireside Chats, Mike and Sarah talk about the possibilities for left publications when print is declining, then discuss the concept of “precarity” in work, and what it means for the future of organized labor. Sarah argues that recent college graduates, with unpaid internships and large student debt, are more like indentured servants than you might think. Then Sarah describes the new frontiers of progressive politics, and she and Mike talk about how feminism’s relationship to economics has changed over the last 40 years. Finally, Sarah attacks Sex and the City feminism, and gives a more substantial alternative.

Jun 8, 2012 — Bill Scher & Matt K. Lewis
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The DMZ
On The DMZ, Bill and Matt discuss the failed attempt to recall Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker. What lessons should Democrats, Republicans, and the labor movement draw? Why didn’t President Obama come out more strongly in favor of the Democratic candidate? Speaking of Obama’s reelection campaign, why is Bill Clinton suddenly off-message? Should Obama be on Clinton’s message? And Matt’s big idea: cable news as we know it won’t survive.
Jun 7, 2012 — Matthew Duss & Eric Trager
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Foreign Entanglements
On Foreign Entanglements, Matt and Eric discuss the surprising results of Egypt’s recent elections. Eric is skeptical that Islamist parties offer a way forward for Egyptian democracy. Matt asks whether the Muslim Brotherhood is a typical religious right party, and Eric argues that they’re something far more dangerous. Matt pushes back, and Eric suggests that Egypt’s future will be one of perpetual instability between the Brotherhood and the military. The two discuss the options facing US foreign policymakers regarding Egypt going forward. Finally, they debate whether it’s possible to regard the new Egypt as a true democracy.
Jun 6, 2012 — Conor Friedersdorf & Robert Wright
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Friedersdorf
Conor asks whether Bob might abandon the Democratic Party over national security issues. Bob posits that humans aren’t evolutionarily equipped to evaluate the possibility of blowback in foreign affairs. Conor wonders why Americans aren’t more willing to impose checks on the executive branch—what won’t the public will accept in the name of “security”? They next discuss whether Obama’s mild manner causes people to accept policies that they would object to under a more cowboyish president. Bob presses Conor about what he hopes to gain by voting for Libertarian Party candidates. They conclude with Bob making the case that network effects all but guarantee Facebook’s long-term success—an argument Conor isn’t buying.
Jun 5, 2012 — Sarah Posner & Marie Ashe
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The Posner Show
On The Posner Show, Sarah chats with Marie about the interwoven history of religious freedom and women’s rights in America. Marie argues that that the 1638 trial of religious dissident Anne Hutchinson reveals a great deal about our ideas of religion and women’s rights, demonstrating a prurient strain that that is still evident in the US today. Moving to more recent history, Sarah and Marie discuss conservative pushback to the line of Supreme Court cases culminating in Roe v. Wade. While Roe and church-state separation have been eroded, the government has become more protective of religious freedom for organizations and individuals claiming conscience objections. Finally: Do corporations have a religious conscience that ought to be protected by the law?
Jun 4, 2012 — Michael Brendan Dougherty & Adam Serwer
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Washington Squares
On Washington Squares, Michael and Adam begin by debating Chris Hayes’s controversial remarks about calling veterans “heroes.” Michael talks about the danger in the fact that the military is the most trusted institution in American society, which Adam suggests has to do with its apolitical nature. They consider whether the process of dissent and conscientious objection in the military can lead to a slippery slope. Michael and Adam discuss the Obama administration’s “kill list” and whether America will ever have peace again. Michael asks Adam whether Romney is the most conservative GOP nominee ever, and Adam explains why that is a dumb question. Finally, Michael and Adam lampoon Mayor Bloomberg’s soda ban, while urging viewers to put down their Dr. Pepper anyway.
Jun 3, 2012 — Conor Friedersdorf & Philip Klein
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Friedersdorf
Conor interviews Phil about his new e-book, Conservative Survival in the Romney Era, which argues that the right must give Mitt Romney the close scrutiny it failed to give George W. Bush. Phil believes Romney only won the GOP primary because of the failure of the conservative base to settle on a credible alternative. Conor wonders why Republican primary voters refused to even consider Jon Huntsman as a candidate, despite his conservative record. The two disagree about whether Tea Partiers confuse being principled with being combative. Phil argues that when it comes to the deficit we have a spending problem, not a revenue problem. Conor insists that a commitment to limited government ought to include restraining the national security state, and criticizes the GOP for being unconcerned with civil liberties.

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